goldvermilion87: (Default)
I woke up inhumanly early this morning, so I watched Star Trek VI, which I'd never gotten around to, to get me into a state of non-zombie-ess.

I enjoyed it, HOWEVER...

If I had all the time in the world (which I don't) I would show it to my class as an example of how not to do literary allusions. It was a classic example of quoting Shakespeare for the sake of quoting Shakespeare in my humble opinion. In Chang's case it might have been okay (I guess it was just his character? But while I loved Khan channeling Ahab "FROM HELL'S HEART I STAB AT THEE! FOR HATE'S SAKE WITH MY LAST BREATH I CURSE THEE" (or something like that...I'm going to reread Moby Dick in about 30 minutes, so I'm not checking myself right now) because Khan WAS a Milton's Satan/Captain Ahab figure, I really don't see what incessantly quoting bits of Shakespeare had to do with Chang.). However, I thought the allusion of the title was AWFUL!

Kirk says "General what's-his-face called the future "the undiscovered country."

Okay. Quick Hamlet lesson, folks:

To be or not to be, that is the question
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune
or to take arms against a sea of troubles.


etc. again... not looking it up and that's as far as I can remember at the moment

But here we have Hamlet deciding whether or not he should kill himself.  Should a person just take the troubles that come or (to quote Blackadder) "just top himself". 

Hamlet does not kill himself if Act I.  Why is this?  We must go on farther in the speech.


To die to sleep, perchance to dream
Aye, there's the rub, for in that sleep of death
what dreams may come must give the something or other pause
For who would fardles bear...blah blah proud man's contumely, etc.
when he could his quietus make on a bare bodkin
But for that:

(here we come to the important bit for my discussion)

THE FEAR OF SOMETHING AFTER DEATH
THE UNDISCOVERED COUNTRY FROM WHOSE BOURNE
NO TRAVELER RETURNS MUST GIVE US PAUSE.

So ignoring the fact that I just massacred Hamlet's most famous speech, we see the point.  The "undiscovered country" is DEATH.  And it is the thing that makes us all scared, not a hopeful future!

But then, that's the point of the movie, isn't it. That they're all scared of the future, because they don't know what it is, and they have to accept it just like Hamlet does in his "There is a special providence in the fall of a sparrow" speech.

I just talked myself into appreciating the allusion.  Oh my. 

Well, I should do silly stuff like this more often.  It obviously helps me think stuff through.

I also need to add some words to my vocabulary so that I don't say "stuff" so often.

I still object to General Chang, though.  Give me Khan any day.

KHAAAAAAAAAANNNN!!!!!!!!

(One of these days I should actually apply myself to memorize that speech.  I think I know almost all the words, but not in order...  It wouldn't take too long, right?)
goldvermilion87: (Default)
I woke up inhumanly early this morning, so I watched Star Trek VI, which I'd never gotten around to, to get me into a state of non-zombie-ess.

I enjoyed it, HOWEVER...

If I had all the time in the world (which I don't) I would show it to my class as an example of how not to do literary allusions. It was a classic example of quoting Shakespeare for the sake of quoting Shakespeare in my humble opinion. In Chang's case it might have been okay (I guess it was just his character? But while I loved Khan channeling Ahab "FROM HELL'S HEART I STAB AT THEE! FOR HATE'S SAKE WITH MY LAST BREATH I CURSE THEE" (or something like that...I'm going to reread Moby Dick in about 30 minutes, so I'm not checking myself right now) because Khan WAS a Milton's Satan/Captain Ahab figure, I really don't see what incessantly quoting bits of Shakespeare had to do with Chang.). However, I thought the allusion of the title was AWFUL!

Kirk says "General what's-his-face called the future "the undiscovered country."

Okay. Quick Hamlet lesson, folks:

To be or not to be, that is the question
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune
or to take arms against a sea of troubles.


etc. again... not looking it up and that's as far as I can remember at the moment

But here we have Hamlet deciding whether or not he should kill himself.  Should a person just take the troubles that come or (to quote Blackadder) "just top himself". 

Hamlet does not kill himself if Act I.  Why is this?  We must go on farther in the speech.


To die to sleep, perchance to dream
Aye, there's the rub, for in that sleep of death
what dreams may come must give the something or other pause
For who would fardles bear...blah blah proud man's contumely, etc.
when he could his quietus make on a bare bodkin
But for that:

(here we come to the important bit for my discussion)

THE FEAR OF SOMETHING AFTER DEATH
THE UNDISCOVERED COUNTRY FROM WHOSE BOURNE
NO TRAVELER RETURNS MUST GIVE US PAUSE.

So ignoring the fact that I just massacred Hamlet's most famous speech, we see the point.  The "undiscovered country" is DEATH.  And it is the thing that makes us all scared, not a hopeful future!

But then, that's the point of the movie, isn't it. That they're all scared of the future, because they don't know what it is, and they have to accept it just like Hamlet does in his "There is a special providence in the fall of a sparrow" speech.

I just talked myself into appreciating the allusion.  Oh my. 

Well, I should do silly stuff like this more often.  It obviously helps me think stuff through.

I also need to add some words to my vocabulary so that I don't say "stuff" so often.

I still object to General Chang, though.  Give me Khan any day.

KHAAAAAAAAAANNNN!!!!!!!!

(One of these days I should actually apply myself to memorize that speech.  I think I know almost all the words, but not in order...  It wouldn't take too long, right?)
goldvermilion87: (Default)
(Yes, that is a forced-Shakespearian-Allusion way of saying "two unrelated things in one post, and I want to sound AWESOME!  :-P  )

1. Why is everyone on "livejournal" referred to as "the lovely _________"  Accuracy aside (I for one am far from lovely...and very few of us post pictures of ourselves...) it just seems a strange modifier of choice.  :-)

2. I am going to try NaNoWriMo.  I think I will update this with my word count every few days.  I may be insane.  No you aren't.  Are you sure?  I think I am.  Pretty sure.  Well, are you sure or not? because the answer is very important!
goldvermilion87: (Default)
(Yes, that is a forced-Shakespearian-Allusion way of saying "two unrelated things in one post, and I want to sound AWESOME!  :-P  )

1. Why is everyone on "livejournal" referred to as "the lovely _________"  Accuracy aside (I for one am far from lovely...and very few of us post pictures of ourselves...) it just seems a strange modifier of choice.  :-)

2. I am going to try NaNoWriMo.  I think I will update this with my word count every few days.  I may be insane.  No you aren't.  Are you sure?  I think I am.  Pretty sure.  Well, are you sure or not? because the answer is very important!
goldvermilion87: (Default)
I tried to write a poem to contribute to MrsPencil's Moor Verse on fanfiction.net.  This was the bizarre result:




Tic(k)s

Each month with one pipette I dose my pup,
My Arthur, with some liquid Frontline Plus ™
To kill the ticks that on his blood would sup,
And induce lyme, and produce scabs and pus.
Just so, I wish, had Doyle destroyed the “tic”
That crept into a country doctor’s prose
And made what had been perfect meter sick
And made the hopeful fangirl shout, “O NOES!”
Perhaps if I had understood sprung rhythm
I would’ve done a Hopkins with these words
But since I don’t, I can do nothing with ‘em
That’s not (me-TER-ic-AL-ly) for the birds
     If only in iambs did the words resound:
     “They were the footprints of a giant hound!”



(Just in case you haven't memorized lines from The Hound of the Baskervilles:  Dr. Mortimer says "They were the footprints of a gigantic hound!" which is most emphatically not iambic pentameter.  *sigh*)

(Also, the "y" in "only" in the penultimate line should be elided with "in".  I have to defend my meter.  :-D)
 


goldvermilion87: (Default)
I tried to write a poem to contribute to MrsPencil's Moor Verse on fanfiction.net.  This was the bizarre result:




Tic(k)s

Each month with one pipette I dose my pup,
My Arthur, with some liquid Frontline Plus ™
To kill the ticks that on his blood would sup,
And induce lyme, and produce scabs and pus.
Just so, I wish, had Doyle destroyed the “tic”
That crept into a country doctor’s prose
And made what had been perfect meter sick
And made the hopeful fangirl shout, “O NOES!”
Perhaps if I had understood sprung rhythm
I would’ve done a Hopkins with these words
But since I don’t, I can do nothing with ‘em
That’s not (me-TER-ic-AL-ly) for the birds
     If only in iambs did the words resound:
     “They were the footprints of a giant hound!”



(Just in case you haven't memorized lines from The Hound of the Baskervilles:  Dr. Mortimer says "They were the footprints of a gigantic hound!" which is most emphatically not iambic pentameter.  *sigh*)

(Also, the "y" in "only" in the penultimate line should be elided with "in".  I have to defend my meter.  :-D)
 


goldvermilion87: (Default)
You know how there's always that character in a story who is very crotchety, but good-hearted, and does good things even though he's sniping at everyone around him? It sounds cute, right? And actions speak louder than words. I won't deny that.

HOWEVER

I have come to the conclusion that attitude and words are more important than those cute grouchy-with-heart-of-gold stories would have us believe.

Mr. Grumpy-Pants )
goldvermilion87: (Default)
You know how there's always that character in a story who is very crotchety, but good-hearted, and does good things even though he's sniping at everyone around him? It sounds cute, right? And actions speak louder than words. I won't deny that.

HOWEVER

I have come to the conclusion that attitude and words are more important than those cute grouchy-with-heart-of-gold stories would have us believe.

Mr. Grumpy-Pants )
goldvermilion87: (Default)

So, my loverly labradoodle, Arthur (And if you read my 5 times story on ff.net: yes, I did put my dog in one of my stories.  I couldn't help myself.)  enoys riding in the car, as every good dog should.  He sits in the front, usually.  When we're driving, I'll often pet him with my right hand, or pat him on the back or something (my car's automatic, so I can do that). 

What I want to know is this: Just how mimetic are dogs?  [also, am I using mimetic right?  It's the only word that comes to mind, and I'm too lazy to check.  It makes Arthur sound like an Aristotelian tragedy...haha]  When he sits next to me in the car, he sits in a loungy, relaxed way, and puts one paw across the console, the same way I would maybe put my hand on his head and scratch it if I were relaxed because I was on a really long car ride.  It's very funny, but is he copying me? or am I just anthopomorphizing him?


goldvermilion87: (Default)

So, my loverly labradoodle, Arthur (And if you read my 5 times story on ff.net: yes, I did put my dog in one of my stories.  I couldn't help myself.)  enoys riding in the car, as every good dog should.  He sits in the front, usually.  When we're driving, I'll often pet him with my right hand, or pat him on the back or something (my car's automatic, so I can do that). 

What I want to know is this: Just how mimetic are dogs?  [also, am I using mimetic right?  It's the only word that comes to mind, and I'm too lazy to check.  It makes Arthur sound like an Aristotelian tragedy...haha]  When he sits next to me in the car, he sits in a loungy, relaxed way, and puts one paw across the console, the same way I would maybe put my hand on his head and scratch it if I were relaxed because I was on a really long car ride.  It's very funny, but is he copying me? or am I just anthopomorphizing him?


goldvermilion87: (Default)
It appears that around the time that Y2K never happened, I was a very morbid little girl.  Yes, indeed.  Perhaps I was far too taken with Eomer? (See title of post.)  While that is an intriquing possibility, I am inclined to dismiss it.  See, in January 2000 I had only read LotR (and only five or six times at that point), I had not seen the Peter Jackson movie, for the very valid reason that they had not been made yet.  I had seen the animated movies.  But the animated movies did not have the utterly gorgeous Karl Urban in them.  Oh yes, he is utterly gorgeous. If it weren't for him, there would be very little reason to watch Star Trek XI.  True Story.  Anyway.  Because I had only read the books, I did not know what an amazing and beautiful character Eomer was, so I was only really obsessed with Sam Gamgee, and a little bit with Faramir (David Wenham.  *sigh* ...  but I loved Faramir long before David Wenham was born.  Well, long before I had even heard that David Wenham was born.  Two very different time frames, come to think of it.)  

But I digress.

Back to me being morbid.  We had to rewrite an Aesop's fable for a class, and then we had (I think...if anyone is actually reading this, and can identify a source for the second story, I'd like to hear it, because I may be misremembering) to come up with our own moral and write our own story for it.  To see proof that I was morbid, read below.

(Just to prove that you can always find someone worse than you, I should point out that I, at least, did not draw diagrams of interestingly evil torture chambers during indoor recess like most of the boys in my class.)




Of Nests and Night )
goldvermilion87: (Default)
It appears that around the time that Y2K never happened, I was a very morbid little girl.  Yes, indeed.  Perhaps I was far too taken with Eomer? (See title of post.)  While that is an intriquing possibility, I am inclined to dismiss it.  See, in January 2000 I had only read LotR (and only five or six times at that point), I had not seen the Peter Jackson movie, for the very valid reason that they had not been made yet.  I had seen the animated movies.  But the animated movies did not have the utterly gorgeous Karl Urban in them.  Oh yes, he is utterly gorgeous. If it weren't for him, there would be very little reason to watch Star Trek XI.  True Story.  Anyway.  Because I had only read the books, I did not know what an amazing and beautiful character Eomer was, so I was only really obsessed with Sam Gamgee, and a little bit with Faramir (David Wenham.  *sigh* ...  but I loved Faramir long before David Wenham was born.  Well, long before I had even heard that David Wenham was born.  Two very different time frames, come to think of it.)  

But I digress.

Back to me being morbid.  We had to rewrite an Aesop's fable for a class, and then we had (I think...if anyone is actually reading this, and can identify a source for the second story, I'd like to hear it, because I may be misremembering) to come up with our own moral and write our own story for it.  To see proof that I was morbid, read below.

(Just to prove that you can always find someone worse than you, I should point out that I, at least, did not draw diagrams of interestingly evil torture chambers during indoor recess like most of the boys in my class.)




Of Nests and Night )

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