goldvermilion87: (Default)
The Kindergarteners have to walk past the teacher's room to get to school, so we always see them and comment on how adorable they are.  Occasionally one of us secondary teachers tries to make conversation. 

TEACHER:  That's a heavy bag.  You must be very strong.
KINDERGARTENER:  ...No
TEACHER:  No? It looks pretty heav--
KINDERGARTENER:  I said, I KNOW!
goldvermilion87: (Default)
The Kindergarteners have to walk past the teacher's room to get to school, so we always see them and comment on how adorable they are.  Occasionally one of us secondary teachers tries to make conversation. 

TEACHER:  That's a heavy bag.  You must be very strong.
KINDERGARTENER:  ...No
TEACHER:  No? It looks pretty heav--
KINDERGARTENER:  I said, I KNOW!
goldvermilion87: (Default)
"Crumpled up in the wastebasket, she found her homework."
goldvermilion87: (Default)
"Crumpled up in the wastebasket, she found her homework."
goldvermilion87: (Default)
Ten years ago I was about two weeks into my first year of high school, when our math class was interrupted for an assembly upstairs. Once we had all filed in, the principal told the school that my dad and one the other two dads who worked in NYC were safe, and though they had yet to hear from the last they had good reason to believe he was as well. Our principal explained that the Twin Towers had been hit by airplanes, and while he was telling us what had happened, a teacher came up and whispered to him, and he told us that they had fallen.

That was probably the most shocking and tragic moment in my experience to that point, and I do not know that it has been surpassed since. I'm very thankful that my dad survived, though he was in the train station under the WTC when the first airplane hit the building, and he worked just a few blocks away.  I'm thankful that both the dads of the kids in my school were unharmed. I'm thankful that it happened relatively early in the morning, before even more people got in to work.   But there were thousands of others--nearly all civillians--who did not survive.

Life goes on, and I know that I personally do not think about 9/11 much, except when I'm driving toward NYC--the skyline still looks wrong.  But there are still those who cannot forget because a father or daughter or spouse is still not there.  There are even more who have lost loved ones in the past ten years who sacrificed themselves to defend our country overseas.  May the tenth anniversary of September 11, 2001 be a reminder to pray that God would protect our country and bless us with peace, and may it make us more thankful for all those who are risking and have lost their lives for us.




goldvermilion87: (Default)
Ten years ago I was about two weeks into my first year of high school, when our math class was interrupted for an assembly upstairs. Once we had all filed in, the principal told the school that my dad and one the other two dads who worked in NYC were safe, and though they had yet to hear from the last they had good reason to believe he was as well. Our principal explained that the Twin Towers had been hit by airplanes, and while he was telling us what had happened, a teacher came up and whispered to him, and he told us that they had fallen.

That was probably the most shocking and tragic moment in my experience to that point, and I do not know that it has been surpassed since. I'm very thankful that my dad survived, though he was in the train station under the WTC when the first airplane hit the building, and he worked just a few blocks away.  I'm thankful that both the dads of the kids in my school were unharmed. I'm thankful that it happened relatively early in the morning, before even more people got in to work.   But there were thousands of others--nearly all civillians--who did not survive.

Life goes on, and I know that I personally do not think about 9/11 much, except when I'm driving toward NYC--the skyline still looks wrong.  But there are still those who cannot forget because a father or daughter or spouse is still not there.  There are even more who have lost loved ones in the past ten years who sacrificed themselves to defend our country overseas.  May the tenth anniversary of September 11, 2001 be a reminder to pray that God would protect our country and bless us with peace, and may it make us more thankful for all those who are risking and have lost their lives for us.




Teaching!

Sep. 5th, 2011 11:38 pm
goldvermilion87: (Default)
Tomorrow is my first day as a full-time teacher. 

It will be a reasonably light day--I only have to teach two of my four Latin classes, Brit Lit, and Western Thought.   I'm really excited.

But all of a sudden I feel sick to my stomach and horribly, horribly nervous.

Teaching!

Sep. 5th, 2011 11:38 pm
goldvermilion87: (Default)
Tomorrow is my first day as a full-time teacher. 

It will be a reasonably light day--I only have to teach two of my four Latin classes, Brit Lit, and Western Thought.   I'm really excited.

But all of a sudden I feel sick to my stomach and horribly, horribly nervous.
goldvermilion87: (Default)

At an Ivy League institution, I should add.

Valleygirl #1: Oh my gaaaaash! in class the other day, the teacher said something that was like, SOOOOOOOOO sexist. It was SOOOOOOOOO offensive!!!!!!!!!!
 
Valleygirl#2: Oh my gaaaaaaaaaash! That's like in my class the other day.  We were looking at statistics of SATs, and the boys are better than us in EVERYTHING, even critical reading.  It was SOOOOOO offensive!!!!!!!!
 
Valleygirl#1: Oh my gaaaaaaaaaaash that IS offensive!

Me:  Resists strong urge to make a comment about how those particular females affected the statistics...

*snrk*

goldvermilion87: (Default)

At an Ivy League institution, I should add.

Valleygirl #1: Oh my gaaaaash! in class the other day, the teacher said something that was like, SOOOOOOOOO sexist. It was SOOOOOOOOO offensive!!!!!!!!!!
 
Valleygirl#2: Oh my gaaaaaaaaaash! That's like in my class the other day.  We were looking at statistics of SATs, and the boys are better than us in EVERYTHING, even critical reading.  It was SOOOOOO offensive!!!!!!!!
 
Valleygirl#1: Oh my gaaaaaaaaaaash that IS offensive!

Me:  Resists strong urge to make a comment about how those particular females affected the statistics...

*snrk*

goldvermilion87: (Default)
I'm beginning Nahum Tate's (in)famous adaptation of King Lear with my First Year Writing Seminar tomorrow.  I'm very interested to see how they'll respond.  I thought it was fascinating, and I love 18th C literature.  I don't know what my primarily-Engineering-student first years (we're not supposed to say "freshman" though I still do) will make of it. 

Here, if you're interested, is his letter, which explains what he did:

Sir,

You have a natural Right to this Piece, since, by your Advice, I attempted the Revival of it with Alterations. Nothing but the Power of your Perswasion, and my Zeal for all the Remains of Shakespear, cou'd have wrought me to so bold an Undertaking. I found that the New-modelling of this Story, wou'd force me sometimes on the difficult Task of making the chiefest Persons speak something like their Character, on Matter whereof I had no Ground in my Author. Lear's real, and Edgar's pretended Madness have so much of extravagant Nature (I know not how else to express it) as cou'd never have started but from our Shakespear's Creating Fancy. The Images and Language are so odd and surprizing, and yet so agreeable and proper, that whilst we grant that none but Shakespear cou'd have form'd such Conceptions, yet we are satisfied that they were the only Things in the World that ought to be said on those Occasions. I found the whole to answer your Account of it, a Heap of Jewels, unstrung and unpolisht; yet so dazling in their Disorder, that I soon perceiv'd I had seiz'd a Treasure. 'Twas my good Fortune to light on one Expedient to rectifie what was wanting in the Regularity and Probability of the Tale, which was to run through the whole A Love betwixt Edgar and Cordelia, that never chang'd word with each other in the Original. This renders Cordelia's Indifference and her Father's Passion in the first Scene probable. It likewise gives Countenance to Edgar's Disguise, making that a generous Design that was before a poor Shift to save his Life. The Distress of the Story is evidently heightned by it; and it particularly gave Occasion of a New Scene or Two, of more Success (perhaps) than Merit. This Method necessarily threw me on making the Tale conclude in a Success to the innocent distrest Persons: Otherwise I must have incumbred the Stage with dead Bodies, which Conduct makes many Tragedies conclude with unseasonable Jests. Yet was I Rackt with no small Fears for so bold a Change, till I found it well receiv'd by my Audience; and if this will not satisfie the Reader, I can produce an Authority that questionless will. Neither is it of so Trivial an Undertaking to make a Tragedy end happily, for 'tis more difficult to Save than 'tis to Kill: The Dagger and Cup of Poyson are alwaies in Readiness; but to bring the Action to the last Extremity, and then by probable Means to recover All, will require the Art and Judgment of a Writer, and cost him many a Pang in the Performance. [Marginal note: "Mr. Dryd. Pref. to the Span. Fryar."]

I have one thing more to Apologize for, which is, that I have us'd less Quaintness of Expression even in the newest Parts of this Play. I confess 'twas Design in me, partly to comply with my Author's Style to make the Scenes of a Piece, and partly to give it some Resemblance of the Time and Persons here Represented. This, Sir, I submit wholly to you, who are both a Judge and Master of Style. Nature had exempted you before you went Abroad from the Morose Saturnine Humour of our Country, and you brought home the Refinedness of Travel without the Affectation. Many Faults I see in the following Pages, and question not but you will discover more; yet I will presume so far on your Friendship, as to make the Whole a Present to you, and Subscribe my self

Your obliged Friend
and humble Servant,

N. Tate.

If you like that, the whole thing is online, here:  http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Texts/tatelear.html.   (BTW:  Jack Lynch is MY FAVORITE PROFESSOR FROM UNDERGRAD.) 
:-)

goldvermilion87: (Default)
I'm beginning Nahum Tate's (in)famous adaptation of King Lear with my First Year Writing Seminar tomorrow.  I'm very interested to see how they'll respond.  I thought it was fascinating, and I love 18th C literature.  I don't know what my primarily-Engineering-student first years (we're not supposed to say "freshman" though I still do) will make of it. 

Here, if you're interested, is his letter, which explains what he did:

Sir,

You have a natural Right to this Piece, since, by your Advice, I attempted the Revival of it with Alterations. Nothing but the Power of your Perswasion, and my Zeal for all the Remains of Shakespear, cou'd have wrought me to so bold an Undertaking. I found that the New-modelling of this Story, wou'd force me sometimes on the difficult Task of making the chiefest Persons speak something like their Character, on Matter whereof I had no Ground in my Author. Lear's real, and Edgar's pretended Madness have so much of extravagant Nature (I know not how else to express it) as cou'd never have started but from our Shakespear's Creating Fancy. The Images and Language are so odd and surprizing, and yet so agreeable and proper, that whilst we grant that none but Shakespear cou'd have form'd such Conceptions, yet we are satisfied that they were the only Things in the World that ought to be said on those Occasions. I found the whole to answer your Account of it, a Heap of Jewels, unstrung and unpolisht; yet so dazling in their Disorder, that I soon perceiv'd I had seiz'd a Treasure. 'Twas my good Fortune to light on one Expedient to rectifie what was wanting in the Regularity and Probability of the Tale, which was to run through the whole A Love betwixt Edgar and Cordelia, that never chang'd word with each other in the Original. This renders Cordelia's Indifference and her Father's Passion in the first Scene probable. It likewise gives Countenance to Edgar's Disguise, making that a generous Design that was before a poor Shift to save his Life. The Distress of the Story is evidently heightned by it; and it particularly gave Occasion of a New Scene or Two, of more Success (perhaps) than Merit. This Method necessarily threw me on making the Tale conclude in a Success to the innocent distrest Persons: Otherwise I must have incumbred the Stage with dead Bodies, which Conduct makes many Tragedies conclude with unseasonable Jests. Yet was I Rackt with no small Fears for so bold a Change, till I found it well receiv'd by my Audience; and if this will not satisfie the Reader, I can produce an Authority that questionless will. Neither is it of so Trivial an Undertaking to make a Tragedy end happily, for 'tis more difficult to Save than 'tis to Kill: The Dagger and Cup of Poyson are alwaies in Readiness; but to bring the Action to the last Extremity, and then by probable Means to recover All, will require the Art and Judgment of a Writer, and cost him many a Pang in the Performance. [Marginal note: "Mr. Dryd. Pref. to the Span. Fryar."]

I have one thing more to Apologize for, which is, that I have us'd less Quaintness of Expression even in the newest Parts of this Play. I confess 'twas Design in me, partly to comply with my Author's Style to make the Scenes of a Piece, and partly to give it some Resemblance of the Time and Persons here Represented. This, Sir, I submit wholly to you, who are both a Judge and Master of Style. Nature had exempted you before you went Abroad from the Morose Saturnine Humour of our Country, and you brought home the Refinedness of Travel without the Affectation. Many Faults I see in the following Pages, and question not but you will discover more; yet I will presume so far on your Friendship, as to make the Whole a Present to you, and Subscribe my self

Your obliged Friend
and humble Servant,

N. Tate.

If you like that, the whole thing is online, here:  http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Texts/tatelear.html.   (BTW:  Jack Lynch is MY FAVORITE PROFESSOR FROM UNDERGRAD.) 
:-)

goldvermilion87: (Default)
You know how there's always that character in a story who is very crotchety, but good-hearted, and does good things even though he's sniping at everyone around him? It sounds cute, right? And actions speak louder than words. I won't deny that.

HOWEVER

I have come to the conclusion that attitude and words are more important than those cute grouchy-with-heart-of-gold stories would have us believe.

Mr. Grumpy-Pants )
goldvermilion87: (Default)
You know how there's always that character in a story who is very crotchety, but good-hearted, and does good things even though he's sniping at everyone around him? It sounds cute, right? And actions speak louder than words. I won't deny that.

HOWEVER

I have come to the conclusion that attitude and words are more important than those cute grouchy-with-heart-of-gold stories would have us believe.

Mr. Grumpy-Pants )

Huh?

Oct. 11th, 2010 12:49 pm
goldvermilion87: (Default)
I'm just going to finish out 2000 in one swell foop, because I looked at the stories that I had written in the first half of 8th grade and they were all...weird.  Really weird.  The first two are titled "character sketches."  I have the vaguest memory of them, but I don't really know what it was all about.

The names are really funny to me.  Actually, all the names in my old stories.  I loved names.  Even now I have a very long list of the names that I will name my children, provided whoever I marry likes them (the names, not the children) and I actually want to bear...fifteen children.

Yeah.  SO not happening.

Anyway, I really love names, but I used to like really strange ones. All I can say is I really labored over those names.  :-)

So, here we have Character Sketch number one.  I suspect it to be based on a fable.

The Horses )
Look Before You Eat )

And finally, the last story.: A combination of Victorian moralizing children's literature and utter weirdness a la yours truly...who truly did keep pet katydids when they were in season for several years.  Also, a funny thing:  Except for the katydids, the characters are nothing like me.  However, the geography of the story is my house.  Even now when I read it, I can see in my head where everything is taking place--my house about 10 years ago. 

Best Friends, Forever? )

Well, I hope you enjoyed.  2001 is around the corner with more fascinating poetry and prose. :-P

Huh?

Oct. 11th, 2010 12:49 pm
goldvermilion87: (Default)
I'm just going to finish out 2000 in one swell foop, because I looked at the stories that I had written in the first half of 8th grade and they were all...weird.  Really weird.  The first two are titled "character sketches."  I have the vaguest memory of them, but I don't really know what it was all about.

The names are really funny to me.  Actually, all the names in my old stories.  I loved names.  Even now I have a very long list of the names that I will name my children, provided whoever I marry likes them (the names, not the children) and I actually want to bear...fifteen children.

Yeah.  SO not happening.

Anyway, I really love names, but I used to like really strange ones. All I can say is I really labored over those names.  :-)

So, here we have Character Sketch number one.  I suspect it to be based on a fable.

The Horses )
Look Before You Eat )

And finally, the last story.: A combination of Victorian moralizing children's literature and utter weirdness a la yours truly...who truly did keep pet katydids when they were in season for several years.  Also, a funny thing:  Except for the katydids, the characters are nothing like me.  However, the geography of the story is my house.  Even now when I read it, I can see in my head where everything is taking place--my house about 10 years ago. 

Best Friends, Forever? )

Well, I hope you enjoyed.  2001 is around the corner with more fascinating poetry and prose. :-P
goldvermilion87: (Default)
Have you ever written anything so blatantly personal--as in not autobiographical, but might as well be--because you were thinking about it, and you really wanted your mom to read it, so she knew what you were thinking about, but you simultaneously didn't because you didn't want her to know what you were thinking?

I have!  And this is that story.  It was written for school, and I was pretty sure Mrs. K, my teacher (at that time she was Miss W.) would show it to my mom, thereby saving me the embarassment of bringing it to my mom, or forcing myself to bring it to my mom.

Also, going blind is my worst fear.  Well, my second worst fear, after being surrounded by spiders.  Eek!

All Things Work Together For Good )
goldvermilion87: (Default)
Have you ever written anything so blatantly personal--as in not autobiographical, but might as well be--because you were thinking about it, and you really wanted your mom to read it, so she knew what you were thinking about, but you simultaneously didn't because you didn't want her to know what you were thinking?

I have!  And this is that story.  It was written for school, and I was pretty sure Mrs. K, my teacher (at that time she was Miss W.) would show it to my mom, thereby saving me the embarassment of bringing it to my mom, or forcing myself to bring it to my mom.

Also, going blind is my worst fear.  Well, my second worst fear, after being surrounded by spiders.  Eek!

All Things Work Together For Good )

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