goldvermilion87: (Default)
First, the opening of Ian McKellan's brilliant (to my mind) adaptation:




Next, the brilliant [livejournal.com profile] angrybeige 's brilliant Richard III cartoon, which is currently my desktop background:



And finally:

I HAVE A BRILLIANT CLASS THIS SEMESTER AGAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  WOOT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
goldvermilion87: (Default)
First, the opening of Ian McKellan's brilliant (to my mind) adaptation:




Next, the brilliant [livejournal.com profile] angrybeige 's brilliant Richard III cartoon, which is currently my desktop background:



And finally:

I HAVE A BRILLIANT CLASS THIS SEMESTER AGAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  WOOT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Oh No

Jan. 5th, 2011 10:19 pm
goldvermilion87: (Default)
Nimue is on Doctor Who, promising to be just as annoying as crazy-mission-impossible-lady as she was as Nimue.

I think I just put a record number of "as"es there.

Also, how did Shakespeare spell "as"es becasue the way I have chosen to spell it seems awkard?

I'm off to research

EDIT:  According to shakespeare.mit.edu I have spelled it a la shakespeare.  I'm too lazy to log into my own university's webpage and search it on EEBO (which is nearly as awesome as the OED, but not quite.  I'm pretty sure I'm staying in academia for the incredible online archives that I could never afford on my own.) and my SHINY NEW ARDEN SHAKESPEARE HAMLET is in my car and I'm definitely not braving the cold for it.

Speaking of shiny new shakespeares, I got a free copy of the newest Norton edition of Hamlet (with Jude Law qua Hamlet on the cover) in my mailbox at school just because the publishing company wants me to buy it for my students.  When I opened it I actually squee-ed.  IN OFFICE HOURS.  BECAUSE I KNOW THAT PROVING TO MY STUDENTS THAT I AM MATURE IS A HOPELESS, HOPELESS TASK.

Oh No

Jan. 5th, 2011 10:19 pm
goldvermilion87: (Default)
Nimue is on Doctor Who, promising to be just as annoying as crazy-mission-impossible-lady as she was as Nimue.

I think I just put a record number of "as"es there.

Also, how did Shakespeare spell "as"es becasue the way I have chosen to spell it seems awkard?

I'm off to research

EDIT:  According to shakespeare.mit.edu I have spelled it a la shakespeare.  I'm too lazy to log into my own university's webpage and search it on EEBO (which is nearly as awesome as the OED, but not quite.  I'm pretty sure I'm staying in academia for the incredible online archives that I could never afford on my own.) and my SHINY NEW ARDEN SHAKESPEARE HAMLET is in my car and I'm definitely not braving the cold for it.

Speaking of shiny new shakespeares, I got a free copy of the newest Norton edition of Hamlet (with Jude Law qua Hamlet on the cover) in my mailbox at school just because the publishing company wants me to buy it for my students.  When I opened it I actually squee-ed.  IN OFFICE HOURS.  BECAUSE I KNOW THAT PROVING TO MY STUDENTS THAT I AM MATURE IS A HOPELESS, HOPELESS TASK.
goldvermilion87: (Default)

Today in my "Shakespeare:  From Stage to Screen" class I showed my students "The Conscience of the King." 

BWAHAHAH!

I enjoyed their reactions.  They actually seemed to get into it more than I thought they would.  We all sniggered a little at the (TERRIBLE) "romantic" scene on the observation deck, but overall I THINK it was a success.  I'll find out for sure on Wednesday--the class is 50 mins long, so there was no time even for brief discussion afterwards. 

Oh, the phaser effect got a laugh.  I guess I can't expect them all to appreciate 60s special effects the way I do. 

I've been watching "I Dream of Jeannie" and "Bewitched" and it occurs to me that the women in Star Trek really are a bit more...liberated?...than those on a typical 60s TV show.  (Not a big concern for me, but my thought whenever I watch either of those sitcoms is "I bet feminists HATE this!"  Hehe)


EDIT:  It is sad to me, though, that they, none of them, will fully appreciate the Kirk-Spock-McCoy scene when they discuss whether or not he should kill Kodos...if he even is Kodos.  Not only is that a classic triumvirate moment, in my opinion--you really see them play out their roles in their little tri-partite soul-society-thing (that's how I think of it, anyway...)--but it's also a really interesting way of changing the Hamlet soliloquies into not-soliloquies.

But we'll talk about it on Wednesday, and I'll try very hard not to get too fangirlish about the scene. 
 

goldvermilion87: (Default)

Today in my "Shakespeare:  From Stage to Screen" class I showed my students "The Conscience of the King." 

BWAHAHAH!

I enjoyed their reactions.  They actually seemed to get into it more than I thought they would.  We all sniggered a little at the (TERRIBLE) "romantic" scene on the observation deck, but overall I THINK it was a success.  I'll find out for sure on Wednesday--the class is 50 mins long, so there was no time even for brief discussion afterwards. 

Oh, the phaser effect got a laugh.  I guess I can't expect them all to appreciate 60s special effects the way I do. 

I've been watching "I Dream of Jeannie" and "Bewitched" and it occurs to me that the women in Star Trek really are a bit more...liberated?...than those on a typical 60s TV show.  (Not a big concern for me, but my thought whenever I watch either of those sitcoms is "I bet feminists HATE this!"  Hehe)


EDIT:  It is sad to me, though, that they, none of them, will fully appreciate the Kirk-Spock-McCoy scene when they discuss whether or not he should kill Kodos...if he even is Kodos.  Not only is that a classic triumvirate moment, in my opinion--you really see them play out their roles in their little tri-partite soul-society-thing (that's how I think of it, anyway...)--but it's also a really interesting way of changing the Hamlet soliloquies into not-soliloquies.

But we'll talk about it on Wednesday, and I'll try very hard not to get too fangirlish about the scene. 
 

goldvermilion87: (Default)
I'm beginning Nahum Tate's (in)famous adaptation of King Lear with my First Year Writing Seminar tomorrow.  I'm very interested to see how they'll respond.  I thought it was fascinating, and I love 18th C literature.  I don't know what my primarily-Engineering-student first years (we're not supposed to say "freshman" though I still do) will make of it. 

Here, if you're interested, is his letter, which explains what he did:

Sir,

You have a natural Right to this Piece, since, by your Advice, I attempted the Revival of it with Alterations. Nothing but the Power of your Perswasion, and my Zeal for all the Remains of Shakespear, cou'd have wrought me to so bold an Undertaking. I found that the New-modelling of this Story, wou'd force me sometimes on the difficult Task of making the chiefest Persons speak something like their Character, on Matter whereof I had no Ground in my Author. Lear's real, and Edgar's pretended Madness have so much of extravagant Nature (I know not how else to express it) as cou'd never have started but from our Shakespear's Creating Fancy. The Images and Language are so odd and surprizing, and yet so agreeable and proper, that whilst we grant that none but Shakespear cou'd have form'd such Conceptions, yet we are satisfied that they were the only Things in the World that ought to be said on those Occasions. I found the whole to answer your Account of it, a Heap of Jewels, unstrung and unpolisht; yet so dazling in their Disorder, that I soon perceiv'd I had seiz'd a Treasure. 'Twas my good Fortune to light on one Expedient to rectifie what was wanting in the Regularity and Probability of the Tale, which was to run through the whole A Love betwixt Edgar and Cordelia, that never chang'd word with each other in the Original. This renders Cordelia's Indifference and her Father's Passion in the first Scene probable. It likewise gives Countenance to Edgar's Disguise, making that a generous Design that was before a poor Shift to save his Life. The Distress of the Story is evidently heightned by it; and it particularly gave Occasion of a New Scene or Two, of more Success (perhaps) than Merit. This Method necessarily threw me on making the Tale conclude in a Success to the innocent distrest Persons: Otherwise I must have incumbred the Stage with dead Bodies, which Conduct makes many Tragedies conclude with unseasonable Jests. Yet was I Rackt with no small Fears for so bold a Change, till I found it well receiv'd by my Audience; and if this will not satisfie the Reader, I can produce an Authority that questionless will. Neither is it of so Trivial an Undertaking to make a Tragedy end happily, for 'tis more difficult to Save than 'tis to Kill: The Dagger and Cup of Poyson are alwaies in Readiness; but to bring the Action to the last Extremity, and then by probable Means to recover All, will require the Art and Judgment of a Writer, and cost him many a Pang in the Performance. [Marginal note: "Mr. Dryd. Pref. to the Span. Fryar."]

I have one thing more to Apologize for, which is, that I have us'd less Quaintness of Expression even in the newest Parts of this Play. I confess 'twas Design in me, partly to comply with my Author's Style to make the Scenes of a Piece, and partly to give it some Resemblance of the Time and Persons here Represented. This, Sir, I submit wholly to you, who are both a Judge and Master of Style. Nature had exempted you before you went Abroad from the Morose Saturnine Humour of our Country, and you brought home the Refinedness of Travel without the Affectation. Many Faults I see in the following Pages, and question not but you will discover more; yet I will presume so far on your Friendship, as to make the Whole a Present to you, and Subscribe my self

Your obliged Friend
and humble Servant,

N. Tate.

If you like that, the whole thing is online, here:  http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Texts/tatelear.html.   (BTW:  Jack Lynch is MY FAVORITE PROFESSOR FROM UNDERGRAD.) 
:-)

goldvermilion87: (Default)
I'm beginning Nahum Tate's (in)famous adaptation of King Lear with my First Year Writing Seminar tomorrow.  I'm very interested to see how they'll respond.  I thought it was fascinating, and I love 18th C literature.  I don't know what my primarily-Engineering-student first years (we're not supposed to say "freshman" though I still do) will make of it. 

Here, if you're interested, is his letter, which explains what he did:

Sir,

You have a natural Right to this Piece, since, by your Advice, I attempted the Revival of it with Alterations. Nothing but the Power of your Perswasion, and my Zeal for all the Remains of Shakespear, cou'd have wrought me to so bold an Undertaking. I found that the New-modelling of this Story, wou'd force me sometimes on the difficult Task of making the chiefest Persons speak something like their Character, on Matter whereof I had no Ground in my Author. Lear's real, and Edgar's pretended Madness have so much of extravagant Nature (I know not how else to express it) as cou'd never have started but from our Shakespear's Creating Fancy. The Images and Language are so odd and surprizing, and yet so agreeable and proper, that whilst we grant that none but Shakespear cou'd have form'd such Conceptions, yet we are satisfied that they were the only Things in the World that ought to be said on those Occasions. I found the whole to answer your Account of it, a Heap of Jewels, unstrung and unpolisht; yet so dazling in their Disorder, that I soon perceiv'd I had seiz'd a Treasure. 'Twas my good Fortune to light on one Expedient to rectifie what was wanting in the Regularity and Probability of the Tale, which was to run through the whole A Love betwixt Edgar and Cordelia, that never chang'd word with each other in the Original. This renders Cordelia's Indifference and her Father's Passion in the first Scene probable. It likewise gives Countenance to Edgar's Disguise, making that a generous Design that was before a poor Shift to save his Life. The Distress of the Story is evidently heightned by it; and it particularly gave Occasion of a New Scene or Two, of more Success (perhaps) than Merit. This Method necessarily threw me on making the Tale conclude in a Success to the innocent distrest Persons: Otherwise I must have incumbred the Stage with dead Bodies, which Conduct makes many Tragedies conclude with unseasonable Jests. Yet was I Rackt with no small Fears for so bold a Change, till I found it well receiv'd by my Audience; and if this will not satisfie the Reader, I can produce an Authority that questionless will. Neither is it of so Trivial an Undertaking to make a Tragedy end happily, for 'tis more difficult to Save than 'tis to Kill: The Dagger and Cup of Poyson are alwaies in Readiness; but to bring the Action to the last Extremity, and then by probable Means to recover All, will require the Art and Judgment of a Writer, and cost him many a Pang in the Performance. [Marginal note: "Mr. Dryd. Pref. to the Span. Fryar."]

I have one thing more to Apologize for, which is, that I have us'd less Quaintness of Expression even in the newest Parts of this Play. I confess 'twas Design in me, partly to comply with my Author's Style to make the Scenes of a Piece, and partly to give it some Resemblance of the Time and Persons here Represented. This, Sir, I submit wholly to you, who are both a Judge and Master of Style. Nature had exempted you before you went Abroad from the Morose Saturnine Humour of our Country, and you brought home the Refinedness of Travel without the Affectation. Many Faults I see in the following Pages, and question not but you will discover more; yet I will presume so far on your Friendship, as to make the Whole a Present to you, and Subscribe my self

Your obliged Friend
and humble Servant,

N. Tate.

If you like that, the whole thing is online, here:  http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Texts/tatelear.html.   (BTW:  Jack Lynch is MY FAVORITE PROFESSOR FROM UNDERGRAD.) 
:-)

goldvermilion87: (Default)
(Yes, that is a forced-Shakespearian-Allusion way of saying "two unrelated things in one post, and I want to sound AWESOME!  :-P  )

1. Why is everyone on "livejournal" referred to as "the lovely _________"  Accuracy aside (I for one am far from lovely...and very few of us post pictures of ourselves...) it just seems a strange modifier of choice.  :-)

2. I am going to try NaNoWriMo.  I think I will update this with my word count every few days.  I may be insane.  No you aren't.  Are you sure?  I think I am.  Pretty sure.  Well, are you sure or not? because the answer is very important!
goldvermilion87: (Default)
(Yes, that is a forced-Shakespearian-Allusion way of saying "two unrelated things in one post, and I want to sound AWESOME!  :-P  )

1. Why is everyone on "livejournal" referred to as "the lovely _________"  Accuracy aside (I for one am far from lovely...and very few of us post pictures of ourselves...) it just seems a strange modifier of choice.  :-)

2. I am going to try NaNoWriMo.  I think I will update this with my word count every few days.  I may be insane.  No you aren't.  Are you sure?  I think I am.  Pretty sure.  Well, are you sure or not? because the answer is very important!
goldvermilion87: (Default)
You know how there's always that character in a story who is very crotchety, but good-hearted, and does good things even though he's sniping at everyone around him? It sounds cute, right? And actions speak louder than words. I won't deny that.

HOWEVER

I have come to the conclusion that attitude and words are more important than those cute grouchy-with-heart-of-gold stories would have us believe.

Mr. Grumpy-Pants )
goldvermilion87: (Default)
You know how there's always that character in a story who is very crotchety, but good-hearted, and does good things even though he's sniping at everyone around him? It sounds cute, right? And actions speak louder than words. I won't deny that.

HOWEVER

I have come to the conclusion that attitude and words are more important than those cute grouchy-with-heart-of-gold stories would have us believe.

Mr. Grumpy-Pants )
goldvermilion87: (Default)
                            I will weep for thee;
For this revolt of thine, methinks, is like
Another fall of man.
goldvermilion87: (Default)
                            I will weep for thee;
For this revolt of thine, methinks, is like
Another fall of man.

Profile

goldvermilion87: (Default)
goldvermilion87

December 2014

S M T W T F S
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324 252627
28293031   

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 22nd, 2017 08:53 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios